Bill's Bountiful Blog

May I keep you posted on my thoughts, ideas, observations, and silliness?. Am I serious? Is it relevant?. Does anyone care? Probably not much.

But in today's age of everyone has something to say, why not me? And who can blame me for jumping into to the pool? For speaking up For laying it out?

"Freedom of the press is guaranteed only to those who own one." - Thomas Wiley, Journalist


Eloise Rocks Out at Hi-Tide Resort

By Wm. May
Published: 07/10/23 Topics: Art, Fishing, Hi-Tide Resort, Photography, Vacation Comments: 0

No one knows exactly how it all got started. Maybe it is a myth.

The dreamy story goes like this. Long ago a young guest brought along a painting set to the beach.

The plan was to create a Vincent Van Gogh worthy painting of the sundown just as the mythical magical but very real great green flash that winks when the sun disappears completely. And just for a second.

Her name was not recorded at the time, but for now we have come to call her "Eloise". There is no record of whether she successfully caught and depicted the momentous moment. But it is something that can be frequently be seen year round from the condos at Hi-Tide.

After wandering the beach, exploring the Moclips River and digging a full limit of Razor Clams , Eloise decided to use her leftover paint to leave a message and art on a small round river rock.

The portrait of her dog, who had accompanied her to HI-Tide, included the dog's name "Picasso" and these lovely words, "I love it here. I will be back."

She placed the rock gently into a flower bed just outside the entrance to the resort office. What happened next started slowly but has grown to become a must-do activity for visitors from all over the world.

Travelers journey to Moclips Beach, staying at our lovely Hi-Tide Resort , and enjoying the very same peace and quiet and stunning beauty of the North Beaches of Washington State.

Some stay for just a few days. Others stay for a week or two or longer. But before they leave, they can ask for paint and a brush with directions were to find a suitable rock on which to paint their message for posterity.

Today, the gardens of HI-Tide Resort are filled with painted rocks and messages of love and life. Better yet, most visitors return year after year. To paint a new rock or to touch-up those which have graced the gardens for decades.

You are invited to make your own memory here and rock out at Hi-Tide.

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Author: Wm. May – Rock Out at Hi-Tide Resort, Hi-Tide Resort
Blog #: 0940 – 07/10/23

Sponsor: Hi-Tide Resort – You can't get any closer to the beach than this. comfy, cozy, modern condos at Hi-Tide-Resort on Moclips Beach WA State. – Hi-Tide-Resort.com

Hi Tide Resort Nearby But Far From Seabrook

By Wm. May
Published: 06/11/23 Topics: Hi-Tide Resort, Moclips Beach WA, Ocean Shores WA, Pacific Beach, Seabrook Resort, Wildlife Comments: 1

We love our neighbor to the south. Seabrook Resort has brought more visibility and new visitors to Washington State's North Beaches from Ocean Shores to Moclips.

Now with 500 new homes perched on a cliff to the south of the town of Pacific Beach, it boasts stores, restaurants, a town hall for weddings, and thousands of neighbors. Newspapers have extolled its virtues and praised the developers for this "New Urbanism"

We are not sure what that means, but praise of our beaches is nothing new. Over 118 years ago, Seattleites hopped trains to "Visit The Shore" at Moclips Beach. and to stave off the city's sweltering summer heat in our warm clime moderated by the refreshing Pacific Ocean.

Since the advent of the automobile, families have zipped to the North Beaches to jump the waves, dig razor clams, collect shells, make sand castles, and watch the sun sink slowly in the west. This is where folks come to getaway, to relax and to invigorate their souls.

At Seabrook, you can pay big money to rent a vacation home for a week or weekend. Or you can rent a moderately priced oceanfront condo at Hi-Tide Resort directly on Moclips' Moonstone beach. And there is a difference here...

From Seabrook town center you will get to trudge 2,000 steps and then descend 200 steep stair steps just to reach the sand, with the ocean another several hundred feet beyond that. While at Hi-Tide you only need to stroll a pleasant 99 steps directly through the level dunes to the ocean. (No steps.)

Of course, if you want to stretch your legs further, you can walk for miles down the coast. And never need go back up any stairs.

Most homes at Seabrook don't have a view, while every one of our condos looks directly out to the rolling surf. The few Seabrook homes that do have a peek-a-boo view may provide binoculars or telescopes, in hopes guests can catch a fleeting glance at seabirds and boats on the horizon.

But you won't need binoculars at Hi-Tide. You can sit on the deck, put your feet up, smell the salty air and marvel as thousands of seabirds swoop and soar directly overhead.

In some seasons there are actually millions of acrobatic Rock Sandpipers, Wandering tattlers, Surfbirds and Black Turnstones migrating from Arctic feedings grounds far to the south. They pass directly overhead and just off the shore.

We must admit Hi-Tide has no swanky restaurants and no tony stores. But if you just can't wait to spend lots of money, take the 8 minute drive to Seabrook. Then after blowing all your cash, zip right back to Hi-Tide to spend all day and all night listening to the ocean and the birds.

Maybe you'll even see that legendary green flash as the golden sun drops below the westerly horizon each evening.

So how about this for a plan - Make a short pit stop at Seabrook to jostle with all the tourists and spend all your money. But stay directly on Moclips Beach at Hi-Tide Resort to rest, relax and recreate.

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Author: Wm. May – Why Stay Anywhere Else, Hi-Tide Resort
Blog #: 0954 – 06/11/23

Sponsor: Hi-Tide Resort – You can't get any closer to the beach than this. comfy, cozy, modern condos at Hi-Tide-Resort on Moclips Beach WA State. – Hi-Tide-Resort.com

The Hampton Wines Scholarship

By Wm. May
Published: 04/11/23 Topics: Aberdeen Washington, Education, Music, People, Self Improvement Comments: 0

Even after taking band for years, when new students entered Weatherwax High School’s band room for the first time, they still had much to learn. Mr. Hampton Wines was the man to teach them.

The sheet music was on the stands, the older students already seated stiffly, instruments out at the ready and the room was quiet. 80 musicians waited. Then the bell rang starting class.

Instantly, Mr. Wines stepped to his stand, raised his baton, gave the beat, and the music raced forward until, when it ended, his review began.

The third chair trumpets were a bit out of tune, the clarinets were entering each stanza a bit early, and the drums – well the drums – were far too loud as usual.

The critique was never personal, then he said “Again, from the top.” The rehearsal went forward all hour, then for days, weeks and months until – every player had learned every tune flawlessly.

Quickly new students became better musicians. But only years later did they realize how much else they had learned.

And it had nothing to do with music.

Students were required to attend “Sectionals” where each type of instrument practices together, sometimes there were evening sessions, and for the marching band, time on the field traipsing to and fro in the rain until the marching and the playing was perfect.

Personal instrument practice was required if a student was to avoid being reprimanded during rehearsal.

Being a trumpet player himself, Mr. Wines (who students and parents would never have dared to call Hampton) challenged every player to complete the dreaded “37 Weeks to Double High C” program of drills, repetition and even calisthenics. For some it took years instead of weeks.

Born in Wisconsin, Hampton spent three years in the Air Force during World War II, and while stationed in Fresno, California met and married his lovely wife Ruth. Together they had 3 children – John, Terry and Candy, all musicians.

After the war, Hampton graduated from the renowned Cincinnati Conservatory of Music in 3 years with degrees in Piano and Music Education. He then spent 4 years teaching band in the mid-west, and 7 years as band leader at the Kennewick, Washington high school.

There he devised a 7-foot tall bass drum, pulled along on a cart, while the band marched during parades. During a Portland Rose Parade his superb musicians, along with the giant drum, caught the eye of a school superintendent who recruited Mr. Wines to come to Aberdeen to “Build the best band ever.”

For the next 22 years, Mr. Wines oversaw band programs at 8 grade schools, and 2 junior high schools while leading the Weather High School Concert Band, Marching Band, Stage Band, Pep Band and other ensembles. They marched at every football game and played non-stop tunes at every basketball game. His bands won contest after contest, delivering perfect score after perfect score.

Mr. Wines invited nationally known professional musicians – such as Bill Page, George Roberts and Sergio Mendez to travel to Aberdeen to play concerts with the high school band.

In the 1960's, he arranged to have the bands record an album, at a time when doing so was new and expensive. Doc Severinson, the nationally admired leader of the Tonight Show TV band, was the guest soloist. When asked, why Aberdeen? Wines said, “Because our kids were that good.”

On four occasions, Mr. Wines arranged to take the entire band, along with chaperones on month-long international concerts tours including to Europe, Mexico and Scotland. They were trips no student will ever forget.

When the Bobcat basketball team made it to the state high school final-four championships one year, Hampton and his 24-person pep band arrived early, and almost marched to the North end of the Seattle Coliseum’s basketball court. There was no clowning around, no chit chat. They were there to do business.

They watched as their rivals the 100 person Renton Washington High School band sauntered in, slapping backs, laughing and lounging haphazardly to the South of the court, 100 feet way. Finally, their instructor coaxed and corralled his players into their seats, where they sat sloppily.

With his back to the court, Mr. Wines faced his band, grinned and whispered, “We'll wait and play after they do.”

The Renton played a song haphazardly, producing a clatter that was out of tune, out of time and barely decipherable. When the music petered out, a few basketball fans clapped politely.

Immediately, Hampton leapt to the front of his Pep Band, the musicians jumped to their feet instruments ready. He brought down his hand (no baton here) to start the music, and then walked away (as was his custom). The Pep Band burst into a fight song that rattled the rafters.

He risked nothing by sauntering away, having drilled his students well, some for 8 years. For every concert, he also started early, stayed late and doubled practices before big appearances.

The entire crowd, including Renton fans, jumped to their feet to clap along. All cheered when the Bobcat song ended and the band bowed. At the end, the play-by-play arena announcer exclaimed, “And that was a Pep Band.”

Mr. Wines stood behind the band unnoticed but beaming. The Renton band leader stared at his shoes, his band members slumped in their seats.

Thousands of students were lucky enough to go through the Weatherwax band program taught by this fellow Mr. Hampton Wines. All of them still love music, many still play, while others went on to great success in other fields.

And all because those young musicians, were lucky enough to have met a man name Hampton Wines who taught them more than music. He showed them how to work diligently and what it felt like to do something great. And to be recognized for it.

- - - - -

The Hampton Wines scholarship is awarded to a student who has or wants to learn how to do something great. It is preferred you love music and already have a start on being a superior player, but being a superior person is more important. Apply today for this scholarship.

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Author: Wm. May
Blog #: 0831 – 04/11/23

Vacation Rental Life Guard Lessons

By William May
Published: 03/07/23 Topics: Behavior, Education, Lodging Management, Sports, Weather Comments: 0

Most people should never attempt to rescue a drowning swimmer.

This seems counterintuitive, but drowning people will do anything to get above the water. Approached by a rescuer the swimmer will jump on top of the other person and drown them both.

You see the problem.

At age 15 I took classes to become a "Junior Lifeguard". At 18, more classes to become a "Senior Lifeguard." In college I barely completed a strenuous 13-week course to earn a "Water Safety Instruction" certification.

In addition to even more lifeguard training, a "WSI" requires the student to become proficient at every swimming stroke and how to teach them.

I took my WSI training while in college at age 21 while (I must say) I was in the best physical condition of my life. The final exam almost drowned me. Repeatedly.

Lesson Learned

The octogenarian female drill sergeant instructor set up one final task to convince students that the only right way to respect water was to pound into us a respect for the water that bordered on absolute terror.

Her message - no matter your physical skill, the ocean, lake, river or pool can kill you quickly if you don’t know what you are doing. It can even kill you if you do know.

And drowning people drown those who try to save them.

Life Lessons

Oddly, all these years later it is safe to say that many aspects of life -- specifically related to careers and business -- are exactly the same. You must know what you are doing or you are taking unnecessary risks.

In the lodging industry, after the gratefully appreciated surge in occupancy, rates and bookings the inevitable has happened.

Travel -- especially drive-to destinations and especially here in the Northwest United States -- is returning to pre-Covid seasonality, affected by all the things which have always affected travel:

  • The economy
  • Employment
  • Regular work weeks
  • School vacations
  • Weather
  • Pesky politics
  • The ever present drum beat of TV, radio, newspapers and the good old internet media anxious to push negative stories.

Unfortunately, that means some property owners will panic, just as a drowning person does. Especially those who bought thinking Covid income would continue forever, even though they were well warned long ago.

Those owners that are desperate for more income are likely to drown their lodging manager, just as the drowning person kills their rescuer. They demand answers to questions they don't know, when there are none.

How We Help

Just like a lifeguard, we are not allowed to turn our backs and ignore a drowning client. So we must push. Persevere, and be patient. We must help in all possible ways.

Unfortunately, the care and hand-holding of these clients diverts time better spent pursuing every possible advertising, pricing and service tool that we full-stack managers have in our quiver. As well as tightly administering all other services.

We do that of course. But we also must politely ask property owners to leave us to our craft and to judge us by our work ethic, not by the state of the economy.

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Author: William May – Contributor, Vacation Rental Association
Blog #: 0950 – 03/07/23

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